In Their Words
  • When I was an incoming freshman, I searched high and low for any pictures or videos of the actual dorm room, and I got nothing. On the NU online tour, it shows you the dorm building, but not the actual room itself. Now, to someone who is just trying to maybe get a feel for what their residence life is like, this would be fine. But for myself (Someone who has a lot of stuff and is also very excited about decorating) this was not sufficient. So, although it will be too late for the freshman now, I hope that this post will be helpful to incoming Norwich students and that you'll be able to find this in your frantic google search for pictures of the actual room. Some info first though: There are two civilian dorms- South and Dalrymple (Or as most people call it, West). The photos below...
  • This Summer I spent two months in Taiwan studying Chinese language and culture through the Army Project Go program. Norwich sent 10 students to this program from all branches of ROTC and various levels of prior knowledge of Chinese. This is one of the great things about Norwich - the opportunities. I would never have thought that I would ever make my way to Asia, let alone study a language with no alphabet. At the Chinese Learning Center in Taiwan, there was a large number of students from Norwich and The Citadel. Being Senior Military Colleges, we often have more slots available to us for military programs than the average school with ROTC because we have the extra training to prepare us. There are definitely times when I’m rucking or standing at morning formation when I think to myself, “Why did I even come here?” It’s a valid question when...
  • Being a part of the Army Spring FTX is one of the most miserable experiences, but at the same time the most rewarding. We started the weekend on Thursday, with a night ruck of over 12 miles. By the time we got settled in our ORP, it was 0230 and we had to wake up the next morning at 0530. Friday and Saturday we had eight lanes in total. Each lane consists of receiving, planning, and executing a mission ranging from raids, to ambushes, to defending our area. The MSIII are graded on their leadership and tactics while the MSIs and MSIIs are there more for gaining experience. Sunday, the MSIIIs went to the range to practice shooting while the MSIs and MSIIs had land navigation on the mountains. One of our points was at the top of a mountain and a few feet away from the point was a...
  • Last Monday, our Cavalry Troop training class earned our Sabers, symbolizing the end of our training. It was great having the support of our rook brother, sisters, and cousins at our ceremony. We also were told our roles in the troop for next year although, I will not have a job in the troop since I will be the 5th Company runner. It has been a long eight or so months of learning horse anatomy, cavalry history, equestrian vocabulary, how to tack, and of course how to actually ride a horse. I’m proud of our training class and am excited to officially be a part of the troop.
  • About half of my platoon participated in the Norwegian Ruck March, an 18.6 mile walk/run with a bag containing a minimum of 25lbs. I was in a team with three of my rook brothers, which made it ten times more bearable - I definitely would never have signed up to compete by myself. Having teammates, we were able to keep morale high and encourage each other to push through. We were all together until the point marking the last three miles. Two of us ended up finishing in time to earn our pins - I finished within the male standard with a time of 4 hours and 28 minutes. The female standard allowed for more time of 5 hours and 15 minutes. Overall, we were all glad we participated in it, although our bodies were pretty messed up by the time we finished. Half the platoon was limping around for...

09/21/2019

09/19/2019

09/17/2019

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